«

»

Oct 29

Print this Post

Heads-Up – Know about the signs of Concussion

What Should I do If a Concussion Occurs?
concussion training

If you suspect that an athlete has a concussion, implement your 4-step action plan:
Remove the athlete from play. Look for signs and symptoms of a concussion if your athlete has experienced a bump or blow to the head or body. When in doubt, keep the athlete out of play.

Ensure that the athlete is evaluated by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.

Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself. Health care professionals have a number of methods that they can use to assess the severity of concussions.  As a coach, recording the following information can help health care professionals in assessing the athlete after the injury:

1.     Remove the athlete from play. Look for signs and symptoms of a concussion if your athlete has experienced a bump or blow to the head or body. When in doubt, keep the athlete out of play.

2.    Ensure that the athlete is evaluated by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion. Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself. Health care professionals have a number of methods that they can use to assess the severity of concussions. As a coach, recording the following information can help health care professionals in assessing the athlete after the injury:

[warning]

Cause of the injury and force of the hit or blow to the head or body

Any loss of consciousness (passed out/knocked out) and if so, for how long

Any memory loss immediately following the injury

Any seizures immediately following the injury

Number of previous concussions (if any)

[/warning] 

3.     Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians about the possible concussion and give them the fact sheet on concussion. Make sure they know that the athlete should be seen by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.

4.   Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional, experienced in evaluating for concussion, says they are symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play. A repeat concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the first—usually within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks)—can slow recovery or increase the likelihood of having long-term problems. In rare cases, repeat concussions can result in edema (brain swelling), permanent brain damage, and even death.

(Content source: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Injury Prevention and Control)

 

Want to learn more?  Read below…

Coach Wallet Card on Concussion       Heads Up Online Training Course              Concussion Poster
A  Fact Sheet for Coaches                   Calsouth Partnerships on Concussion        Know the Signs
Concussion Research Paper 1            Concussion Research Paper 2                   Concussion Fact Sheet
The Sports Concussion Institute         The National Sports Concussion Coalition 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.lnysa.org/heads-up-know-about-the-signs-of-concussion/